200 Level Courses

ART STUDIO

202 Introduction to Scenic Design
204 Introduction to Painting I
205 Introduction to Painting II
211 Stained Glass Studio I
212 Stained Glass Studio II
221 Batik Studio
222 Weaving Studio
233 Introduction to Printmaking
240 Pastels
255 Watercolour - Techniques and Approaches
265 Introductory Animation
271 Introduction to Digital Photography
259 Introductory Filmmaking
ST298 Interdisciplinary Art through Indigenous Pedagogy
ST2xx Introduction to Architectural Design

ART HISTORY

244 History of Photography
251 Medieval Art
252 Baroque Art
258 Impressionism
260 20th Century: Modern Art
261 Contemporary Art
ST295 Romanticism to Impressionism: 19th Century Art
ST299 Global Contemporary Art

 

ART STUDIO


202 Introduction to Scenic Design

202 Introduction to Scenic Design

 

This course will cover the steps in the creation of theatre sets and lighting designs. Both sections of the course will be, principally, project based with ‘hands on’ experience at each stage of the growth from conception to finished project. Facts and theory, while covered, will be subordinate to the creative process. There will be a series of smaller projects each week, which in turn will lead to the completion of a major design project for a play chosen by the instructors.

3 Credits
Prerequisite: 100 Drawing or permission of the instructor based on the student’s resume of theatre experience or letter of interest

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204 Introduction to Painting I
205 Introduction to Painting II 

formerly Art 200 Painting I

204 and 205 PaintingStFX student artworks

This pair of complementary courses will introduce you to the fundamental principles of representational painting. You’ll begin by exploring colour, the formal language of painting, and the techniques and tools available to an artist to create expressive and dynamic paintings. In the first semester, there is an emphasis placed on developing a disciplined, healthy working practice by managing time, materials and methods effectively. As foundation skills develop, individual exploration is encouraged and fostered by critiques and the exchange of ideas. There will also be lectures on historical themes to provide you with knowledge of the rich history of the medium. Other discussions delve into theory, critical issues and the exciting developments of painting in contemporary art.
Students who have previously taken Art200 Painting I or ST Art299 Introduction to Painting may not enrol in these courses.

Art 204: 3 Credits
Prerequisite: 102 Drawing or portfolio submission

Art 205: 3 Credits
Prerequisite: 204 Introduction to Painting I

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211 Stained Glass Studio

Details from art student Rowan Murphy, Landscape, 2016

There is nothing quite like a beautiful stained glass artwork to transform a space! Imagine if it were created by---you! Step by step, I'll introduce you to the techniques of working with stained glass using the copper-foil technique: transferring patterns, cutting and grinding, soldering (yes you will melt metal), assembling, soldering, and finishing. Over the course of the term, you will produce a unique 2D panel. You are encouraged and supported to work in your own style, and draw upon your passions, identity, experiences and culture to create the design. Major "ooohh/aaaaw" factor when you bring your project home!

3 Credits
Prerequisite: 101, 102 Drawing (formerly Art 100) or 115 Introduction to Design

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212 Stained Glass Studio II

StFX student artwork

Everything you loved about Stained Glass I, only more! (and in 3 dimensions) This hands-on studio course is a continuation of Stained Glass Studio I, introducing intermediate-level techniques. I'll show you how to design a 3D stained-glass structure such as a lamp, as well as do all the steps in the technical process: transferring patterns, cutting and grinding, soldering panels, assembling, soldering and finishing. You are encouraged to design in your preferred art style, and express your individual, identity, experiences, and culture. Imagine the “light bulb moment,” and the amazement of your fans!

3 Credits
Prerequisite: 211 Stained Glass Studio I

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221 Batik Studio

221 batik

Have you ever heard of Batik? Not everybody has. But if you have ever seen sarongs from Bali or traditional cloth from West Africa or India, you have probably seen batik! Batik is a Javanese word for an ancient art form practiced in various parts of the world, dating from at least 1000 BCE. Designs and images are created on textiles by the alternate application of dyes and a “resist” such as melted wax. My aim in this course is to provide you with technical batik skills, while encouraging you to create artwork inspired by your own personal journey, identity, and culture. The course also looks at other forms of resist dyeing, such as tie-dye and tritik (shibori).

3 Credits
Prerequisite: 101, 102 Drawing (formerly 100 Drawing), 115 Introduction to Design or 145 Introduction to Colour or, a portfolio demonstrating drawing and design skills

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222 Weaving Studio

Student Work L-R: Aggie Hennessy, Theora Holden, Danielle Makar

This course offers an introduction to tapestry weaving and its techniques. Students will initially learn to weave a tapestry based on a sampler designed by the instructor. Students will then apply this knowledge to a small-format tapestry of their own design. An artist’s statement and a written exam are also aspects of course evaluation.

Tapestry is a technique of weaving that is more than 2000 years old; it is practiced by cultures around the world. The cloth produced by various groups of weavers takes on different aesthetics and functions according to each culture. Besides sharing a common technique, tapestry woven cloth plays numerous cross-cultural roles: social, spiritual, political, economic, and artistic. These many facets of tapestry will be explored through a series of videos that highlight cultural traditions and international perspectives.

3 Credits

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231 & 232 Etching Studio I & II

Not longer offered. See 233 Introduction to Printmaking.

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233 Introduction to Printmaking

formerly Selective Topic 298 Printmaking

An introduction to printmaking, this course presents intaglio and relief print through three printmaking techniques: line etching, 2-plate linocut and 4-colour reductive linocut. Each technique is explained through instructional demonstrations following examination of printmaker’s works. While creating three original images, students will acquire design skills, learn to use safely etching and carving tools on metal and linoleum blocks, gain appreciation for materials such as specialty papers and inks, and learn how to print on a traditional intaglio press and by hand with a spoon. This course will foster artistic expression while developing technical accuracy and precision. There is no pre-requisite for this course, all are welcome. Find out more about printmaking from the Museum of Modern Art, New York - What is a Print?

3 Credits

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240 Pastels

 

The essence of pastels is the aesthetic experience of drawing with colour. The course is designed to introduce chalk pastels as a painting medium. With the various techniques that create the beautiful effects of pastel painting, the student will learn basic colour theory and composition. Class participation in problem solving discussions about painting will be encouraged. The course will explore the various ways to mix, layer and blend colours with chalk pastel. Class assignments will explore the genres of still life, landscape and portrait. Drawing skills are strongly recommended.

3 Credits
Pre-requisite: 100 Drawing or, equivalent portfolio

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255 Watercolour - Techniques and Approaches

 

In this course students familiarize themselves with the materials and the basic techniques of transparent watercolour painting. Instruction will include various classic and innovative approaches to this versatile medium, using works by well-known masters of watercolour painting as a jumping-off point for student's own exploration in the medium.

3 Credits
Prerequisite: Art102 Drawing (formerly Art100 Drawing) or, a portfolio

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265 Introductory Animation

In this course, students will learn the basics of animation. Projects include simple 2D animation (flip-book, hand drawn and digital animation) and Stop Motion. There is a self-directed final project in which students will expand on acquired technical and theoretical knowledge of animation fundamentals. There are many different ways to approach animation, so a high level of drawing skill is not necessary. A laptop and digital camera are necessary. Open-access free animation software will be used.

3 Credits

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259 Introductory Filmmaking

Students will learn the basic principles of storytelling, cinematography, sound, editing, interviewing, and producing. Operating as a one-person crew, each student will create three video projects using their own equipment (usually their phone) and free editing software. Additionally, students will expand their understanding of cinema through watching films, focusing on independent documentary works by Canadian filmmakers who are underrepresented in the industry (women, Indigenous, Black, People of Colour, and LGTBQ2S+).

3 Credits

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271 Introduction to Digital Photography

Image: Kevin Dooley

This class is designed for students interested in learning to effectively use digital photography as a means for self-expression, artistic medium, or cultural comment. No equipment will be needed except for a smart phone.


3 Credits

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298 Selected Topics - Interdisciplinary Art through Indigenous Pedagogy

From right to left: found object seal bone, Cape Breton orange alabaster, industry waste, Photography Michelle Sylliboy

Students will engage in creative inquiry and interdisciplinary art making processes through Indigenous pedagogy. They will create art in response to readings, guest talks and through group work. An overview of Indigenous pedagogy and art practices and their potential as integral parts of Indigenous traditions will be explored through discussions, workshops and hands-on project works.


3 Credits

Instructor: Michelle Sylliboy

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2xx Selected Topic - Introduction to Architectural Design

Sample floor planImage source: Pixabay

This course will cover the fundamentals of architectural design structured around each student’s design of a small building.  Students learn the basic elements of architectural graphics, perspective, knowledge of spatial requirements and construction techniques while producing a set of working drawings for the building they design.


3 Credits

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Art History


244 History of Photography

Eadweard Muybridge, Motion Study (Woman jumping over a chair), 1867; Collotype, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

From the public announcement of a viable process in 1839, to the present day, photographic images have come to dominate our visual world. This course will examine the history of photography through its technology and through the work of key photographers, styles, and purposes. It will also consider photography as a medium for art in itself, its position and relationships with the traditional arts, and its extraordinary power to construct a world.

3 Credits
No Prerequisite

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251 Medieval Art

Catacombs of Peter and Marcellinus,Rome 2-4 C.; Chartres Cathedral, Jamb Statues of Saints, 12th C.; Lindisfarne Gospels, Carpet Page c.700; The Good Shepherd, Mausoleum of Galla Placidia, Ravenna 5th C.

This course examines major developments in art and architecture of the Middle Ages, from the triumph of Christianity in Imperial Rome through the late Gothic period of the 14th Century. The Bible and most early Church theologians associated images with idolatry and paganism, yet this 1000-year period was one of exceptional richness and diversity in Christian visual arts. We will see how medieval art and architecture reflect and respond to changing theological, devotional and societal needs.

3 Credits

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252 Baroque Art

Caravaggio, The Conversion of St Paul, 1601; Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-portrait, c.1665; Diego Velázquez, Las Meninas, detail, 1661; Johannes Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring, c.1665; Gian Lorenzo Bernini, The Ecstasy of St Teresa, 1647-52

This course explores developments in the visual arts in Europe during the 17th Century. Works of art and architecture will be examined in their social and cultural contexts, including discussion of the Italian Counter-Reformation and new ideas about the function of religious images and buildings, urban planning and the glory of Rome, absolutist monarchies and visual propaganda, specialization in the art market and Dutch genre painting, and the rise of art academies and art theory.

3 Credits

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258 Impressionism

Pierre Auguste Renoir, Girl with A Watering Can, 1876; Georges Seurat, Sunday on La Grande Jatte, 1885; Vase with 12 Sunflowers,1888; Claude Monet, Water Lilies, 1906

An important movement in French painting during the second half of the 19th century, Impressionism greatly influenced Modern Art. This course will critically examine the subject in an historical and international context.

3 Credits
Prerequisite: 141 History of Art I, 142 History of Art II (or equivalent)

See ST295 for a complementary area of study

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260 20th Century: Modern Art

Frida Kahlo, Self-portrait, 1940; Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory, 1931;

This course examines the origins of modernist endeavor in the late 19th century and covers art up to the end of World War II. Attention will be paid to major movements and artists, parallel movements in literature and music, the social and political context, and new technologies.

3 Credits
Prerequisite: 141 History of Art I, 142 History of Art II (or equivalent)

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261 Contemporary Art

Peter von Tiessenhausen, Sanctuary, 2012, Installation and performance

This course examines art from the end of World War II to the present day. Attention will be paid to major movements and artists, the social and political context, and the changing assumptions of what art should be and do.

3 Credits
Prerequisite: 141 History of Art I, 142 History of Art II (or equivalent)

See ST299 for a complementary area of study

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295 Selected Topic:
Romanticism to Impressionism: 19th Century Art

295_Romanticism to Impressionism.jpg

Images: L-R Francisco Goya, The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters (No. 43), from Los Caprichos, 1799 (The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art); Henry Rocher, Edmonia Lewis, c. 1870 (National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution); Vincent van Gogh, Starry Night, 1889 (MoMA); Paul Gauguin, Merahi metua no Tehamana (Tehamana Has Many Parents or The Ancestors of Tehamana), 1893 (The Art Institute of Chicago).

This course is a critical examination of the effects of imperialism, colonialism, and slavery on the arts during the nineteenth century, with a focus on race, gender, and ecology. The course includes in-depth discussions of artists like Francisco Goya, Edmonia Lewis, Mary Cassatt, Vincent van Gogh, and Paul Gauguin. Whether they embraced, rejected, or atoned for modernization, the artists studied in this course chronicled dramatic changes that still affect us today, and provided marginalized perspectives on the experience of modern life.  

3 Credits

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299 Selected Topic:
Global Contemporary Art

Zacharias Kunuk, Isuma Collective, Silakut: Live From the Floe Edge, 2018

This course will investigate art made between the late 1980s and the present day seen via a global perspective and the concept of globalization. The growing importance and diversity of art made around the world, other than in the Euro-American sphere, and the replacement of traditional centres of art-making with an astonishing array of alternative venues, make the art of our time both exhilarating and challenging.

3 Credits

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