Courses Offered in 2021-2022

FALL COURSES

100 LEVEL: ENGL 100, 111/112, or equivalent is required for entrance to all other ENGL courses.

ENGL 100 Introduction to Literature and Critical Writing
This course introduces students to the critical tools and methods of literary study, including close reading and argumentative writing. Students will learn about the history of genres (e.g. poetry, drama, and the novel) and forms of literature (e.g. tragedy, realism). Texts may include the earliest writing in English to more recent works in various media. Credit will be granted for only one of ENGL 100, ENGL 110 or ENGL 111/112. Six credits.This course introduces students to the critical toolsand methods of literary study

ENGL 100:11 Introduction to Literature and Critical Writing 
Mary McGillivray - Full Year 
Language, Myth, and Culture. This 6- credit course is a broad survey of Literature in English, exploring various genres and differing historical contexts. Some focused attention will also be paid to developing skill in critical essay-writing. We will look at works that showcase heroes and monsters, scoundrels and saints, as we encounter various forms of poetry, drama, and novel. We begin at the very dawn of written literature in English in its early form, Anglo-Saxon (translated into Modern English), and continue until the late 19th century. The time-span of the texts to be studied is 1,000 years. This course is the foundation course for any further study in literature in English. It is also a useful introduction to understanding the nature of language and its relation to culture as it evolves through time.

ENGL 100:12 Introduction to Literature and Critical Writing
Earla Wilputte - Full Year 
Language, Myth, and Culture. This 6-credit course introduces students to the critical tools and methods of literary study, including close reading and argumentative writing, through the study of the major literary periods from Medieval times to the Romantic era. The Arthurian adventure of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the comedy The Taming of the Shrew about how to domesticate a headstrong woman, the novella Fantomina about a girl of many disguises, and Frankenstein, the story of a creature brought to life by an ambitious scientist, as well as a selection of poetry give students the opportunity to compare and contrast themes and characters as well as to trace the use of myths, tropes, and ideas through the ages. 

ENGL 111 Literature and Academic Writing 1
This course provides students with the key skills needed to succeed at university. You will learn how to write argumentatively; how to build a question or problem from a close-reading of a literary work; how to develop that argument by presenting and analyzing evidence; how to engage in scholarly debate; how to do university-level research. Theme details below (see Winter Courses for ENGL 111:25, 111:26, and 111:68)

ENGL 111:11 True Stories
Maureen Moynagh 

Reading and writing—apparently simple tasks—play such a powerful role in the
formation of a soul equally capable of invention, witness, transformation, and resistance.

Jorie Graham

Why study literature? The American poet Jorie Graham offers one answer to this question, an answer that is arguably poetic in its concern with intangible, yet vital qualities. In studying literature, and writing about it, we are engaged in the project of developing key worldly capacities, according to Graham. To achieve these aims, we will read a variety of works in different genres and media, all of which will address the theme of true stories. We will ask what counts as a true story, why we are drawn to true stories, and how we recognize the “truth” of stories. In our efforts to address this theme we will focus on how literary texts work and doing so will help us to realize some additional goals: to develop our critical thinking skills; to learn how to analyze complex problems; to acquire some understanding of diverse cultures. The course will also introduce you to university-level writing about literature, including how to develop a literary-critical question from a close reading of a literary work, how to develop a thesis, structure an argument, and how to present and document evidence from a literary work.

ENGL 111:12 The Most Important Course of Your University Career
Laura Estill 
No matter what your major or planned career, critical thinking and communication are key for success. This class helps students build a metaphoric toolbox for understanding literature and culture. Some of the tools we will add to our toolbox include rhetorical analysis, close reading, genre study, book history, and cultural studies. We will analyze a range of texts including poetry, drama, prose, and television; fiction and non-fiction; medieval to contemporary. We will learn how to research at the university level and how to write clearly and persuasively.

ENGL 111:13 Writing with the Undead
Cory Rushton
Detailed description to follow.

ENGL 111:14 Labyrinths and Rabbit Holes
Earla Wilputte 
This course provides students with the key skills needed to succeed at university including how to build a question or problem from a close-reading of a literary work; how to develop that argument by presenting and analyzing evidence; how to write argumentatively; how to engage in scholarly debate; how to do university-level research. The course demonstrates how reading, writing, and research can lead us through labyrinthine twists and turns of thought as we pursue ideas, and down rabbit holes as we are led by our curiosity. A variety of poetry and prose, as well as the novella Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde will be studied.

ENGL 111:15 Reading Between the Lines: An Introduction to Genre and Narrative
Kailin Wright 
What makes a good reader and writer? This course turns to literature and film for examples of ideal readers and misleading narrators as students learn critical reading and writing skills. Students will examine a diverse range of works—including fiction, film, poetry, theatre, advertisements, and music—to learn how to read between the lines and analyze stories (even when the narrator tries to lie to us). In teaching students how to be better readers and writers, this course is essential preparation for any future university class or career.

ENGL 111:16 Reading Between the Lines: An Introduction to Genre and Narrative
Kailin Wright 
What makes a good reader and writer? This course turns to literature and film for examples of ideal readers and misleading narrators as students learn critical reading and writing skills. Students will examine a diverse range of works—including fiction, film, poetry, theatre, advertisements, and music—to learn how to read between the lines and analyze stories (even when the narrator tries to lie to us). In teaching students how to be better readers and writers, this course is essential preparation for any future university class or career.

ENGL 111:17H TBD
Khoury, Joseph
Detailed description to follow. 

ENGL 111:18 The Monster and the Monstrous in Literature Over Time
Mary McGillivray
This course is a brief encounter with Literature in English, exploring different genres and historical contexts. Attention will also be paid to developing skills in clear expression and in critical essay-writing. While studying the form and substance of selected texts, we’ll examine a recurrent theme: the monster and the monstrous in literature over time. We begin at the very dawn of written literature in English in its early form, Anglo-Saxon (translated into Modern English), and continue until the early 19th century. The time-span of the texts to be studied is 1,000 years – monsters of one sort or another are everywhere. This course is part of a pair of foundation courses for any further study in literature in English.

ENGL 111:19 Escape by Metaphor
Douglas Smith 
Detailed description to follow.

ENGL 111:20 Writing with the Undead
Cory Rushton
Detailed description to follow.

ENGL 111:21 Journey’s End
Suzanne Stewart
As we study one novel, Jane Eyre, and a selection of short stories, we will see how journeys, literally and metaphorically, underpin each of these works: travels in search of a fulfilling home; dilemmas associated with leaving one’s family; restless late-night wandering in urban streets; uprooting oneself to secure employment; secretive routes in pursuit of love; avenues of remembrance into the past; voyages of a story, orally told, when recounted through multiple generations. As readers, we will ask a series of questions. Are journeying and wayfaring integral to human existence? Is each of us engaged in a pilgrimage through life, not only in exterior, geographic ways, as we move from place to place, but also in interior, more private respects? Do journeys ever end: fulfill their purpose? Literature will illuminate our insights.

ENGL 111:22 TBD
Katie Edwards
Detailed description to follow.

ENGL 111:23 Journey’s End
Suzanne Stewart
As we study one novel, Jane Eyre, and a selection of short stories, we will see how journeys, literally and metaphorically, underpin each of these works: travels in search of a fulfilling home; dilemmas associated with leaving one’s family; restless late-night wandering in urban streets; uprooting oneself to secure employment; secretive routes in pursuit of love; avenues of remembrance into the past; voyages of a story, orally told, when recounted through multiple generations. As readers, we will ask a series of questions. Are journeying and wayfaring integral to human existence? Is each of us engaged in a pilgrimage through life, not only in exterior, geographic ways, as we move from place to place, but also in interior, more private respects? Do journeys ever end: fulfill their purpose? Literature will illuminate our insights.

ENGL 111:66 TBD
Michael D'Arcy
Offered through Continuing & Distance Education

ENGL 111:67 TBD
Lin Young
Offered through Continuing & Distance Education

ENGL 112 Literature and Academic Writing II
This course follows ENGL 111. It introduces students to the study of literature by familiarizing them with literary-critical concepts and terminology, by fostering an understanding of genre and form, by teaching the fundamental skill of close-reading, and by introducing them to literary works from a range of historical periods. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. Credit will be granted for only one of ENGL 100 or ENGL 111/112. Three credits. Theme details below (see Winter Courses for ENGL 112:21, 112:22H, 112:23, 112:24, 112:25, 112:26, 112:27, and 112:28).

ENGL 112:10 The Poetic Process
Paul Marquis
This course is an extension of English 111.10. As such, it elaborates its objectives: to enable students to acquire skills in the close reading of literary texts. These objectives will be pursued in discussions that link writing about literature to the poetic process; a process that involves “making” a story, whether it be a dramatic story, a revelation about how one feels, or a longer narrative found in a novel. All stories are poetic, which means, as the root of the word suggests, that they involve the process of being made. 

 

200 LEVEL: Prerequisite: ENGL 100, 111/112, or equivalent.

ENGL 208 Sex, Love, and Literature
Michael D'Arcy 
Why does culture become obsessed at certain moments with love stories that end in happy marriages? Why, at other moments in history, does literary culture insist on telling stories of unhappy love, frustrated desire, toxic relationships, or self-destructive passion? What is the connection between sex and political arrangements in a given society? Why is it so hard to tell a good story about a happy marriage? These are some of the questions this course will consider as we examine how modern culture, from the eighteenth century to the present, imagines sex and love. We’ll read stories of happy and unhappy love, impossible love, unrealized love, sexual fantasies, self-destructive obsessions, desire and its frustration. We’ll consider why certain desires or experiences are seen to be unacceptable or illicit at certain moments in time, and changing views of what is acceptable in sexual and intimate experience. We’ll discuss famous love stories, contemporary novels, film, and television shows that address the complexities of sexuality and desire. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 224 Short Stories, Big Effects
Doug Smith
This course will explore the development of the short story, from Poe to today. We will examine the formal features of short story (e.g. length, effect); the distinctiveness of the genre (as opposed to the tale, flash fiction, the novella, the novel); the genre’s development in different national contexts; and its ongoing importance for contemporary culture. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 226 From Tablets to Tablets: Texts and Technology
Laura Estill
This book history course examines how texts have been disseminated over time in order to demonstrate how material contexts affect textual meaning. Topics might include changing practices and ideas of authorship, publication, and reading. Evidence considered could span from early textual objects (clay tablets) to today’s technologies (computers, tablets, phones). Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 227 Writing From "Here": The Literature of Atlantic Canada
Mary McGillivray
This course will consider the rich literature of the Atlantic region with particular focus on the many and diverse voices (including African Nova Scotian, Mi’kmaw, Scottish and Irish Gaelic, and Acadian in translation) emerging in the post-Centennial era of Atlantic Canada. Various genres including poetry, novels and short story along with art and film will be encountered. Students will be encouraged to participate actively in discussion and original research. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits

ENGL 233 Children's Literature: 1865 to the Present
Kailin Wright 
Using the landmark publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland as a reference point, this course provides a critical survey of children’s literature in nations such as the UK, America, Russia, and Canada. Authors to be studied include Carroll, L.M. Montgomery, Robert Munsch, and Maurice Sendak. In addition to examining the historical development of Children’s literature, and evolving definitions of childhood, this course will investigate variations of a single narrative—such as Cinderella or The Little Mermaid—in different nations and historical contexts. Some of the critical issues to be explored include ageism, gender, race, class, and the Disney phenomenon. Credit will be granted for only one of ENGL 233 and ENGL 234. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 240 Literature of the Middle East
Joseph Khoury
Most people are surprised to learn that great literature exists in the Middle East. They are even more surprised when, as they read the literature, they discover that it is quite controversial, even graphic. The goal of the course is to give you a basic understanding of life in the Middle East. This is not easy because often what we know about the region comes from bad news stories. These must be discussed, too, and the literature demands that the discussions take place. Another goal of the course is to teach basic history of the region. Historical knowledge allows us to comprehend some of the continuing political difficulties. I understand that these are ambitious goals (the course is only three credits), but the hope is that you will leave the course with a desire to learn more about the Middle East. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 248 Climate Fiction and Environmental Literature
Mathias Nilges 
How do we imagine “nature” and our relationship to it at different points in history and in different contexts? What are we to make of these differences in our imagination, and how do they shape the sociopolitical realities of our relationship to our environment and to environmental crises? In what ways are environmental futures determined by the possibilities and limits of our imagination? How, for instance, are our responses to the climate emergency limited by what we believe to be “realistic” or “(im)possible?” And how does our inability to stray beyond self-imposed limits in our present and our inability to imagine different environmental futures keep us from formulating bold responses to the challenges of our time? What role can art and literature play in the attempt to explore, probe, and expand the limits of our environmental imagination? And, by extension, what role can (must?) art and literature play in pushing thought and imagination beyond these limits in order to help shape the reality of our environment and our social, political, and cultural responses to the climate emergency?

This course introduces students to some of the central texts and debates in two connected fields: environmental literature, a longstanding, rich facet of the literary field sometimes also identified as “ecofiction,” and climate fiction (cli-fi), a recent, currently booming sub-section of environmental literature. Alongside the introduction to environmental literature and cli-fi, students will also read central texts of one of the most significant fields of literary studies in recent decades: ecocriticism. Studying ecofiction and ecocriticism in relation to each other begins with basic questions about the general process of writing and thinking environments. Not surprisingly, there are many forms of ecofiction. There is realist ecofiction and experimental ecofiction, there are ecological novels that are located in the terrain of speculative fiction and those that attach their epistemological project to the structure of the nouveau roman. In fact, if we look at ecofiction, we quickly notice a seemingly inexhaustible combination of traditions and genres. It is precisely this heterogeneity that we will foreground and study in this course. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 267 Introductory Creative Writing
Doug Smith 
Students are introduced to the techniques of writing creatively in the genres of poetry, short stories, drama, etc. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits

ENGL 272 Melancholy and Madness (P)
Earla Wilputte
Hamlet famously notes, “I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercise,” a state in which many of us often find ourselves. This course offers a survey of how the psychological and physical states of melancholy feature in literature through language, imagery, metaphor, and by gender. Medical treatises, plays, poems, and novels present melancholy variously as consciousness of the existence of the soul, a sensitivity for the human condition, a rich source of creative inspiration, or the “black dog” of overwhelming despair. Hamlet, selections from The Anatomy of Melancholy, various 18th-century poems, and the novel Rasselas will be studied and discussed to explore different perspectives on and perceptions of melancholy. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits. 

ENGL 282 Literatures of Global Justice: Human Rights, Asylum, Self-Determination
Maureen Moynagh
Can literature help us see others as equal human beings? From abolitionist literature to contemporary narratives about asylum seekers and refugees, literature has long been a means of advancing claims for justice and fostering understanding across global divides. Focusing primarily on twentieth- and twenty-first century texts from around the world, and covering a range of topics from colonialism, gendered oppression, to conflict and displacement, and environmental racism, this course will ask how literature serves justice. Topics will include ways of imagining justice and ethics from the “witness to suffering” through “reconciliation” and “precarious life” to “hospitality”; slave narratives and abolition; narratives of development and human rights; residential school narratives and Indigenous rights; asylum stories and refugee rights. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

 

300 LEVEL COURSES: Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 plus at least three credits at the 200 level unless otherwise noted.

ENGL 309 Film Noir
Michael D'Arcy
Why does American culture become fixated on the connection between crime and sexual desire in the middle of the twentieth century? Why does darkness in various forms come to define the look and feel of a major strand of Hollywood filmmaking in this period? Why do attractive criminals make such good film characters? These are some of the questions we’ll address as we consider a mode of filmmaking that has come to be called “film noir.” The focus will be on the classic period of film noir, the 1940s and 1950s, and the dark crime films from this period that are seen as defining this mode of cinema. The course will also address the hard-boiled crime fiction of the mid-twentieth century (such as the work of Raymond Chandler and James Cain) that was intrinsic to the development of the noir aesthetic, as well as later historical developments of noir cinema (in the French New Wave of the 1960s, 1970s American cinema, and contemporary superhero films). Students will be introduced to major formal and historical distinctions that have developed in the history of thinking about cinema. Prerequisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits.

 ENGL 378 Human Scale: Contemporary American Literature
Jason Potts
Human scale is the practice of measuring and designing things to match the physical and cognitive characteristics of humans. But what happens when the world falls out of scale? When cities become too large to be knowable? When the internet makes information seem infinite? When the size of multinational corporations no longer resembles persons? When the world undergoes change at a rate that makes memories fraught. We will read mostly detective and sci-fi novels and watch films on architecture and design to understand post-1960’s changes in scale and their effects on individuals Prerequisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits Prerequisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits.

English 391 Selected Topics I (P)
Paul Marquis 
The topic for 2021-2022 is Suffering and Truth in Shakespeare's Tragedies. In Shakespeare, tragedy occurs because one cannot anticipate the consequences of one’s actions.  One wants to know the truth and so one acts accordingly. The consequences are horrific, accompanied by intolerable and undeserved suffering.  Only then do Shakespeare’s characters acquire insight, Aristotle’s anagnorisis, and the ultimate truth of the human condition. We will trace the evolution of suffering in Shakespeare’s tragedies, from its early manifestation in the Prince of Denmark to its later realization in Prospero, the maligned magician who achieves final enlightenment and reconciliation only through the artful manipulation of his enemies. Prerequisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits.

 

400 LEVEL COURSES: Normally students enrolling in a senior seminar will have third-year standing and have taken a minimum of 18 credits in English. The senior seminars are offered on a priority basis to senior Advanced Majors and Honours students in English who are required to take one 3-credit senior seminar in the Fall term, and another 3-credit senior seminar in the Winter term.  All other interested students should inquire with the departmental Chair (jpotts@stfx.ca) or Administrative Assistant (english@stfx.ca) about availability and prerequisites.
All students seeking admission to honours and advanced major programs must consult the department chair (jpotts@stfx.ca) by March 31 of the second year to obtain approval for proposed course patterns, and again in March of the junior year for advice on thesis and senior seminar requirements.

ENGL 400 Honours Thesis
Jason Potts - Full Year
Honours students write a thesis under the supervision of a faculty thesis director. Students must meet the thesis director in March of the junior year to prepare a topic. Honours students must register for the thesis as a six-credit course in the senior year. The thesis must be submitted no later than March 31 of the senior year. See chapter 4 of the Academic Calendar. Six credits.


Senior Seminars:

ENGL 491 Selected Topics I (P)
Paul Marquis
The topic for 2021-2022 is Suffering and Truth in Shakespeare's Tragedies. In Shakespeare, tragedy occurs because one cannot anticipate the consequences of one’s actions.  One wants to know the truth and so one acts accordingly. The consequences are horrific, accompanied by intolerable and undeserved suffering.  Only then do Shakespeare’s characters acquire insight, Aristotle’s anagnorisis, and the ultimate truth of the human condition. We will trace the evolution of suffering in Shakespeare’s tragedies, from its early manifestation in the Prince of Denmark to its later realization in Prospero, the maligned magician who achieves final enlightenment and reconciliation only through the artful manipulation of his enemies. Prerequisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits. 

ENGL 497 Advanced Major Thesis
Jason Potts - Full Year
Advanced major students write a thesis based on work done in any 300- or 400-level class, taken in the Fall of the Senior year. See chapter 4 of the Academic Calendar.

ENGL 499 Directed Study
In consultation with the department and with approval of the chair, students may undertake a directed study program in an approved area of interest, which is not available through other course offerings. Three or six credits.


WINTER COURSES

100 LEVEL: ENGL 100, 111/112, or equivalent is required for entrance to all other ENGL courses.

ENGL 111 Literature and Academic Writing 1 
This course provides students with the key skills needed to succeed at university. You will learn how to write argumentatively; how to build a question or problem from a close-reading of a literary work; how to develop that argument by presenting and analyzing evidence; how to engage in scholarly debate; how to do university-level research. Theme details below (see Fall Courses for ENGL 111:11, 111:12, 111:13, 111:14, 111:15, 111:16, 111:17H, 111:18, 111:19, 111:20, 111:21, 111:22, and 111:23).

ENGL 111:25 The Syntax of the Fourth Dimension
Paul Marquis 
Syntax is another word for composition: how sentences, paragraphs, essays are composed, their shape and trajectory: how they breathe. The fourth dimension is time. Combined, these two activities constitute the basis of writing, academically or creatively, which we study in this course by reading literature closely and writing about it clearly and effectively.

ENGL 111:26 Vampires, Monsters, Androids: The Inhuman in Modern Culture 
Michael D'Arcy 
The word inhuman is used to describe behaviour considered to be barbaric, atrocious, not proper for human beings. Sometimes the word is applied to not-quite-human entities—robots, monsters, aliens, vampires. This course will consider famous and influential instances of the inhuman in modern culture, addressing the blurring of the distinction between the human and the non-human—we’ll discuss vampire stories, science fiction films, contemporary android fiction, stories about human insects. We’ll learn how to carry out effective writing projects, focusing on reading and research skills, and developing clear, persuasive writing.

ENGL 111:68
Lin Young
Offered through Continuing & Distance Education

ENGL 112 Literature and Academic Writing II 
This course follows ENGL 111. It introduces students to the study of literature by familiarizing them with literary-critical concepts and terminology, by fostering an understanding of genre and form, by teaching the fundamental skill of close-reading, and by introducing them to literary works from a range of historical periods. Prerequisite: ENGL 111. Credit will be granted for only one of ENGL 100 or ENGL 111/112. Three credits. Theme details below (see Fall Courses for ENGL 112:10).

ENGL 112:21 The Road of Excess
Doug Smith
Detailed description to follow.

ENGL 112:22H TBD
Mary McGillivray
Detailed description to follow.

ENGL 112:23 Crime and the City
Michael D’Arcy 
Why is it that the big city comes to be especially associated with crime in the modern cultural imagination? How does the teeming urban world become a source of fascination, desire, and fear? These are some of the questions this course will address as we read and discuss fiction and film engaged with the convergence between urban experience and crime. We’ll consider classic detective fiction (Sherlock Holmes stories), film noir, and other crime stories, ranging from the nineteenth century to the present.

ENGL 112:24 On Justice
Maureen Moynagh

I believe in the power of the imagination to remake the world, to release the truth within us, to hold back the night, to transcend death, to charm motorways, to ingratiate ourselves with birds, to enlist the confidences of madmen.
J.G. Ballard

On J.G. Ballard’s account, imagination allows us to achieve truly remarkable feats—world-changing feats—as well as more whimsical, fantastic, even slightly kooky exploits. Literature is one of the ways humans use their imaginations, so it follows that literature gives us ways of at least thinking about “remak[ing] the world,” “releas[ing] the truth within us,” and a few other crazy ideas. One potentially world-changing idea that literature allows us to imagine is justice. In this course, we will take up this theme by looking at the ways writers from across the globe, writing at different moments in history, have shaped their plays, novels, films and short stories in order to help us think about (in)justice.

ENGL 112:25 The Fantastic: Magic and the Supernatural
Lin Young
From swashbuckling swordsmen to bloodsucking vampires, bickering gods and cursed princes, the 'fantastic' in literature can incorporate both wonder and terror. How can strange, fantastical worlds allow us to see our own more clearly? How can terrifying monsters or magical creatures prompt us to consider the broader themes of human experience? This course will introduce students to the core genres of literature by considering texts that incorporate this broad definition of 'the fantastic.'

ENGL 112:26 For Love’s Sake
Suzanne Stewart
This class explores what is, arguably, the most powerful human emotion: love. In what varied ways, over time, have authors expressed this basic aspect of our human condition? In three sections, we will pursue that question. Poetry: In a study of sonnets, we examine not only the form itself but also the authors’ articulations of romantic (often unrequited) love, as well as love for nature, solitude, or God, and the absence of love (in death, war, or a seemingly random universe). Short Stories: In this section, we consider how social class or jealousy can obstruct love; how love is misdirected to material possessions or social status; and how love can be felt powerfully for animals. Novel: Finally, we will read E.M. Forster’s Room with a View (1905), which deals with love of beauty (art and architecture), as well as romantic love that triumphs over the barriers of social class. This story transports us to Italy (in the middle of a Canadian winter!).

ENGL 112:27 For Love’s Sake
Suzanne Stewart
This class explores what is, arguably, the most powerful human emotion: love. In what varied ways, over time, have authors expressed this basic aspect of our human condition? In three sections, we will pursue that question. Poetry: In a study of sonnets, we examine not only the form itself but also the authors’ articulations of romantic (often unrequited) love, as well as love for nature, solitude, or God, and the absence of love (in death, war, or a seemingly random universe). Short Stories: In this section, we consider how social class or jealousy can obstruct love; how love is misdirected to material possessions or social status; and how love can be felt powerfully for animals. Novel: Finally, we will read E.M. Forster’s Room with a View (1905), which deals with love of beauty (art and architecture), as well as romantic love that triumphs over the barriers of social class. This story transports us to Italy (in the middle of a Canadian winter!).

ENGL 112:28 TBD
Katie Edwards
Detailed description to follow.

 

200 LEVEL: Prerequisite: ENGL 100, 111/112, or equivalent.

ENGL 207 World Masterpieces II (P)
Paul Marquis
Literature and Myth. This course examines the foundations of myth as exemplified in a selection of literary works from various narrative traditions at different periods in the history of the world. Though we situate ourselves in at least two literary works in English literature, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Kiss of the Fur Queen, which draws upon the myths of the Christian and Indigenous traditions, our investigations will involve heroic quests of several mythical characters in the Hindu, Muslin, and Buddhist narrative traditions. Prerequisite: ENGL 100, 111/112, or equivalent. Three credits. 

ENGL 215 Principles and Practices of Literary Criticism
Cory Rushton
This course builds on the skills acquired in first year English. We will broaden our understanding of what literature is and how it works. We will develop our abilities to see how different approaches to texts allow us to understand their formal, gendered, historical, political, psychological, racial and sociological impacts. We will expand our practical skills by: enlarging our critical vocabularies; sharpening our argumentative writing abilities; and increasing our proficiency with sources and databases. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits 

ENGL 223 Creative Writing: Nature, Ecology, Climate Change
Doug Smith
This course will require students to write fiction, poetry, and personal essays on the topics of Nature, ecology, conservation, and climate change. Students will be required to conduct research in these areas and apply it to their personal views and convictions. Students will conduct individual and collective in-class editing of their submitted written work on a weekly basis. Prerequisite: ENGL 100, 111/112, or equivalent. Three credits. 

ENGL 236 Children’s Film and Television
Cory Rushton
Children’s film and television are highly lucrative and competitive fields. This course will survey landmarks in children’s media across the world, looking at questions of adaptation, suitability, merchandising-driven story, and franchising. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 258 Television Today
Jason Potts
This course introduces students to current debates about television and its role in contemporary culture. We will emphasize the manner in which programs develop narratives (episodically, serially, in story arcs) and the manner in which they are received (weekly, binge watching). We will watch one classic serialized show, one season of a post-network premiere show (like The Sopranos or The Wire or Mad Men, and one season of a very current show (like Atlanta or Master of None).

After examining some of the formal and technical aspects of television, we will turn our attentions to examining how televisions stories are told, paying particular attention to post-network productions. Along the way, we will get into issues including: genre, origins, characters, cliffhangers, closure and reception. We will look at these issues from both the perspective of the critic and of the showrunner. By the end of the semester we should have a strong understanding of the possibilities and problems involved in telling stories on television in the 21st century. Subscription fees for online content providers may be required. Credit will be granted for only one of ENGL 258 and 297 (offered in 2016-2017). Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits. 

ENGL 269 Me You Us Them: Self & Society
Jason Potts
What defines individualism? How does one become self-reliant? Is selfishness inherently wrong? What do I owe society and what can it demand of me? How are group attachments – racial, national, gendered – formed and how are they maintained? These are questions that novelists, poets, and essayists have taken up with energy and intensity since the 18th-century. This course examines why literary works provide particularly powerful answers to these sorts of questions. We will read some of the classic American texts – Emerson, Thoreau, Melville and Whitman – alongside first-wave feminist, African-American and indigenous writing to examine the consequences of trying to draw boundaries around the self in different places. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 270 The Romantic Gothic: Poetry and Short fiction
Earla Wilputte
This survey of the emergence of the Gothic in poetry and short fiction by various 19th-century authors will examine how social and cultural anxieties about the female body, social degeneration and the criminal underworld, marriage, the advancement of science and medicine, and other spectres that haunt us are translated into literature about the supernatural, doppelgangers, and madness. Selected authors include Wordsworth, Hoffmann, Poe, Hawthorne, and Rossetti, among others. 

ENGL 277 Shakespeare’s Subversive Poetry: A Study of his Narrative Poems, Sonnets, and Love Lyrics (P)
Paul Marquis 
Shakespeare’s subversive poetry breaks with tradition by rejecting the formal, thematic, and mythical conventions of the past. We find in the narrative poems, sonnets, and selected plays, the inversion of gender roles, including aggressive and seductive heroines; lengthy and empathetic portrayals of victims of sexual violence; and provocative meditations on various positions and kinds of love making, both serenely idealistic and sensually detached. These poems and plays focus on the complex nature of human desire and the power and eloquence of the female voice in a manner that anticipates the modern world postmodern world. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits.

ENGL 278 Short Turns: The Short Story in Canada
Mary McGillivray 
The short story is the literary form that has arguably won Canadian Literature the highest sustained international recognition both critically and popularly. This course will engage in in-depth analysis of profound expressions of the construction of the self (or selves) in the modern world. Various voices and narrative modes in dialogue with such questions will be encountered, arising in works from writers of diverse backgrounds and social strata. . Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 or equivalent. Three credits. 

 

300 LEVEL COURSES: Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or 111/112 plus at least three credits at the 200 level unless otherwise noted.

ENGL 302 The Fantastic: Genre and Form
Cory Rushton
The Course of Cthulhu: Race, Misogyny and Cosmic Horror following Lovecraft. Can H. P. Lovecraft’s influential work in horror and science fiction be salvaged? This course will try to answer that question. Pre-requisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits.

ENGL 314 Contemporary Literary Theory
Mathias Nilges 
Sidearm. It’s one of the anagrams of “misread.” What is no more than linguistic happenstance is fortuitous in a sense, for it indicates the fact that misreading is frequently weaponized and strategically deployed as a method of disruption, misinformation, and manipulation. And, of course, while this has always been true, the significance of misreading becomes ever greater in the information age. But what exactly is misreading? By extension, what is reading? Is reading aimed at making meaning of an object or a text? Or are there other ways of reading that are not primarily interested in meaning? For instance: a piece of music, a movie, or a novel may create an emotional response in you. Is that response meaningful? Do discussions about how a novel may have made some of us feel have a place in academic inquiry? What would we have to believe interpretation is if we assume that feelings are a valid response to an object? We are often asked to interpret literature by conducting “close readings.” But what exactly is close reading? When does close reading break down (by reading either too closely or not closely enough)? Is close reading about finding out the meaning of a text? And, if so, how do we go about this? If we are interested in meaning, then where is the meaning of a text located? What role do the author and the reader play in this regard? If you are told to interpret a text, what are you actually being asked to do? What is the difference between interpreting a work of literature, a painting, a movie, a philosophical text, laws, a news story, a confusing late-night text message? Many other academic disciplines use literature for their purposes. Psychology likes to examine literature to exemplify a given set of conditions, Sociology and Political Science like to use literature as evidence of sociopolitical problems or phenomena, and so on. But do those uses constitute readings? Are they actually interpretations or readings of literary texts? This course will examine recent debates surrounding the fundamental questions and methods of literary studies that in turn have direct consequences for our understanding of the work of the academic humanities more broadly. We will see how different schools of thought have answered the questions raised in the paragraph above and what may be at stake in the differences between their answers. We will ask how our understanding of interpretation, intention, meaning, and so on affect discussions about hate speech, racism, or legal interpretation. Credit will be granted for only one of ENGL 314 or ENGL 445. Prerequisite: 9 credits of ENGL; ENGL 215 is recommended. Three credits. 

ENGL 316 How to Judge a Book By its Cover
Laura Estill
In this class, we will “read” the material contexts and paratexts of literature that influence how we think about the books and texts we read. We will discuss book history, anthologies, and the literary canon.  This course offers a broad overview of the importance of paratexts - from advertisements to indices - from the middle ages to the present. Students will analyze texts from a book historical perspective, considering how presentation affects reception and meaning. Prerequisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits. Credit will be granted for only one of ENGL 398 and ENGL 397(offered 2019).

ENGL 328 Celtic Kings, Heroes and Monsters - Medieval Wales
Ranke de Vries
Cross-listed course. See Celtic Studies in the Academic Calendar for further details. 

ENGL 329 Studies in Women Writers: Feminisms and Their Literatures
Maureen Moynagh
How do the struggles feminists engage in inform literary works? An introduction to diverse feminist debates within their historical, cultural and political contexts, this course explores the relationships between particular feminisms and the literary texts that exemplify or extend them. The particular focus on a feminist struggle and corresponding body of literary works will vary, depending on the instructor. Cross-listed as WMGS 329. Prerequisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits.

ENGL 397 Selected Topics in Literature I
Kailin Wright
The topic for 2021-2022 is Adaptation or Appropriation?: How Stories Enact Change. This course explores how contemporary adaptations retell popular stories in order to break with tradition and make space for new voices. This course begins by applying theories of adaptation and appropriation to current examples, such as the Appropriation Prize scandal, The Hunger Games, and Hamilton. Considering adaptations from a range of genres (including fiction, theatre, visual art, and film), we will then investigate adaptors’ strategies for altering canonical sources and enacting real-world change. Prerequisite: 9 credits ENGL. Three credits.

 

400 LEVEL COURSES: Normally students enrolling in a senior seminar will have third-year standing and have taken a minimum of 18 credits in English. The senior seminars are offered on a priority basis to senior Advanced Majors and Honours students in English who are required to take one 3-credit senior seminar in the Fall term, and another 3-credit senior seminar in the Winter term.  All other interested students should inquire with the departmental Chair (jpotts@stfx.ca) or Administrative Assistant (english@stfx.ca) about availability and prerequisites.
All students seeking admission to honours and advanced major programs must consult the department chair (jpotts@stfx.ca) by March 31 of the second year to obtain approval for proposed course patterns, and again in March of the junior year for advice on thesis and senior seminar requirements.

ENGL 492 Selected Topics in Literature II
Kailin Wright
The topic for 2021-2022 is Adaptation or Appropriation?: How Stories Enact Change. This course explores how contemporary adaptations retell popular stories in order to break with tradition and make space for new voices. This course begins by applying theories of adaptation and appropriation to current examples, such as the Appropriation Prize scandal, The Hunger Games, and Hamilton. Considering adaptations from a range of genres (including fiction, theatre, visual art, and film), we will then investigate adaptors’ strategies for altering canonical sources and enacting real-world change. Prerequisites: third-year standing and 15 credits English. Three credits.