Undergraduate Studies

Mathematics

The scope of mathematics ranges from computer science to philosophy, from physics to finance, from biology to the fine arts. Mathematics emphasizes precision and logic, but also creativity, elegance and problem-solving. While mathematics is a subject with a rich history (some techniques, results and open problems go back thousands of years), it is also a subject that is very much alive, with new theories and applications continually arising. While mathematical and statistical models and methods form the basis of scientific and engineering fields, they are also used in such diverse areas as modern communication, cryptography, animation, banking and finance, policy development and consultation, public health care, and architecture. With an undergraduate degree in mathematics and statistics, students often go on to pursue an education degree to become a teacher or a graduate degree to become a researcher. However, the career options are much broader. Students with a strong background in mathematics and statistics develop problem-solving skills, logical thinking, and creativity, which serve them well for any career path.

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers degrees in both the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Arts. Because of the diversity of programs offered, students are encouraged to consider their academic goals at an early stage in their studies, and to consult the chair and other members of the department regarding course selection.

Statistics

Statistics is the science of data and is a useful tool for research in virtually all areas of human endeavor. It involves collecting, organizing, summarizing, and analyzing information in order to draw conclusions. The practice of statistics takes into account the notion of uncertainty (variability), which leads to error when estimating something, predicting something, or making a decision. It is important, therefore, to measure and, if possible, control error. The framework for quantifying uncertainty is probability, which is a mathematical theory used to describe and analyze chance events. For this reason, probability is the foundation of statistics. Statistics is used in many different fields: medical studies, economics, GNP growth, forecasting, stock market valuations, futures pricing, sociological studies, social policy, marketing research, opinion polls, political polls, industrial processes, environmental processes, and ecological processes and issues.

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers degrees in both the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Arts. Students must meet the general requirements of both the faculty and the department. Please consult the Academic Calendar for additional details.

Degrees Offered

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Major, Advanced Major, and Honours

All students who want to pursue a major, advanced major, or honours degree in mathematics must take the following core courses: 

  • MATH 106 or 126
  • MATH 107 or 127
  • MATH 253
  • MATH 267
  • MATH 277
  • MATH 491 (or STAT 491)
  • STAT 101
  • CSCI 161 is required for advanced major and honours students but cannot be counted in the advanced major or honours credits
  • CSCI 162 is required for honours
  • MATH 493 (or STAT 493) is required for honours

BA Honours with subsidiary subject programs are available with the departments of economics and English

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Major, Advanced Major, and Honours

All students who want to pursue a major, advanced major, or honours degree in mathematics must take the following core courses:

  • MATH 106 or 126
  • MATH 107 or 127
  • MATH 253
  • MATH 267
  • MATH 277
  • MATH 491 (or STAT 491)
  • STAT 231
  • CSCI 161 is required for advanced major and honours students but cannot be counted in the advanced major or honours credits
  • CSCI 162 is required for honours
  • MATH 493 (or STAT 493 for statistics concentration) is required for honours

In addition the senior seminar, MATH 491 (or STAT 491 for statistics concentration), is required for all major, advanced major and honours candidates. Further, students.

Advanced Major in Mathematics with Business Administration

All students who want to pursue the B.Sc. Advanced Major in Mathematics with Business Administration should follow the advanced major in mathematics as listed above. The degree awarded is a B.Sc. with Advanced Major. Students must also take

  • ECON 101
  • ECON 102
  • BSAD 101
  • BSAD 102
  • BSAD 471
  • 12 credits from BSAD 221, 223, 231, 241, 261, 281, plus 9 additional BSAD credits.

JOINT BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Joint B.Sc. programs are available with the departments of biology, chemistry, earth sciences and physics. Students interested in these programs should consult with the relevant department chairs.

STATISTICS CONCENTRATION

Major, Advanced Major or Honours in Mathematics

All students who want to pursue the statistics concentration should follow the applicable major, advanced major, or honours in mathematics as listed above. In years 3 and 4

  • 9 credits must be STAT 311, 331, and 333 for a major
  • 12 credits must be STAT 311, 331, 333, 334 for advanced major
  • 15 credits must be STAT 311, 331, 333, 334, 357(435); and STAT 493 must be chosen as the thesis course

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE CONCENTRATION

Major, Advanced Major or Honours in Mathematics

All students who want to pursue a concentration in actuarial science should follow the applicable major/advanced major/honours program in mathematics as listed, with

  • 12 credits of STAT 333, STAT 334, MATH 236, and one of STAT 331 or 357 (435)
  • ECON 101
  • ECON 102
  • BSAD 221
  • BSAD 241
  • BSAD 342

The following courses have been approved for Validation by Educational Experience (VEE) credits by the Society of Actuaries (SOA) for the period ending December 31, 2022.

  • STAT 334
  • ECON 101
  • ECON 102
  • BSAD 241
  • BSAD 342 

STAT 333 covers a large portion of thematerial on the first preliminary examination (Exam P–Probability) of the SOA. STAT 445 is strongly recommended. STAT 331, 445, and MATH 236 covers some of the material on the SOA “Statistics for Risk Modeling Exam”.

Students planning a career in actuarial science are strongly encouraged to complete two or more of the SOA preliminary exams before graduation. The concentration meets the SOA Recognition Tier UCAP-IC. Further information is available here.

PRE-EDUCATION CONCENTRATION

Major in Mathematics

All students who want to pursue the pre-education concentration should follow the applicable major in mathematics as listed above. In years 3 and 4

  • 15 credits must be chosen from MATH 254, 347, 371, 372, 387; STAT 333
  • Second teachable may be chosen from any subject category in section 6.1.4 of the Academic Calendar
  • Candidates must follow the degree regulations in sections 4.1 or 7.1 of the Academic Calendar

MINOR OR SUBSIDIARY

All students who want to complete a minor or subsidiary in mathematics should complete 6 credits of calculus, 3 credits of statistics, and 15 additional credits of MATH or STAT courses.

Students completing a minor or subsidiary and who plan to pursue a career in secondary school teaching with mathematics as their second teachable are advised to select the remaining 15 credits of MATH or STAT from the following:

  • MATH 253
  • MATH 277
  • MATH 347
  • MATH 371
  • MATH 372
  • STAT 311

If your degree is not B.Sc. with Major, (including advanced major, honours, and joint degrees) then MATH 101, 102 are also options.

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

This optional academic program offers mathematics students the opportunity to gain 12 months of professional, paid work experience in a range of opportunitiesin industry, government and not-for-profit across Canada. Students can gainvaluable technical and professional experience in areas including (but not limited to) modelling, analysis and design to reinforce classroom-based instruction and to increase students’ networks and employability. COOP 405 can be used as a MATH elective or as an open elective. For further information on work term sequencing options and professional development training topics see section 9.13 of the Academic Calendar.