Registration Guide - Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Aquatic Resources

Welcome to the Bachelor of Arts
with a Major in Aquatic Resources!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Aquatic Resources is very easy.  Most courses are required.  If you plan to do a Major in Public Policy and Social Research, there is only one course for which you will need to make a choice.  If you plan to do a Major in Economics, you have a variety of choice in the selection of your two elective subjects.

 
First-Year Course Pattern:  Public Policy and Social Research
AQUA 101 - Introduction to Freshwater Systems and Resources (first term)
AQUA 102 - Introduction to Ocean Systems and Resources (second term)
ECON 101 - Introductory Microeconomics - 3 credits (first term)
ECON 102 - Introductory Macroeconomics - 3 credits (second term)
ESCI 171 - Understanding the Earth - 3 credits (first term)
BIOL 112 - Diversity of Life - 3 credits (second term)
PSCI 101 - Introduction to Power and Politics - 3 credits (first term)
PSCI 102 - Introduction to Comparative and Global Politics - 3 credits (second term)
Anthropology or Sociology - 6 credits in one subject (see below)
 
ANTH 111 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology/Archaeology - 3 credits (first or second term)
ANTH 112 - Introduction to Socio-cultural Anthropology - 3 credits (first or second term)
OR
SOCI 101 - Introduction to Sociology I - 3 credits (first term) 
SOCI 102 - Introduction to Sociology II - 3 credits (second term)
 
If you are unsure which of these two subjects to choose, look at the upper-level courses in each discipline to see which appeal to you the most.  As you will be taking additional courses in this subject in future years, upper-level courses in which you have the most interest should dictate your choice of introductory-level courses.
 
 
First-Year Course Pattern:  Economics
AQUA 101 - Introduction to Freshwater Systems and Resources (first term)
AQUA 102 - Introduction to Ocean Systems and Resources (second term)
ECON 101 - Introductory Microeconomics - 3 credits (first term)
ECON 102 - Introductory Macroeconomics - 3 credits (second term)
ESCI 171 - Understanding the Earth - 3 credits (first term)
BIOL 112 - Diversity of Life - 3 credits (second term)
Anthropology or Political Science or Sociology - 6 credits in one subject (see below)
Arts or Science course(s) - 6 credits, normally in one subject (see below)
 
Economics majors in the Aquatic Resources program must complete one of the following three options:
ANTH 111 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology/Archaeology - 3 credits (first or second term)
ANTH 112 - Introduction to Socio-cultural Anthropology - 3 credits (first or second term)
OR
PSCI 101 - Introduction to Power and Politics - 3 credits (first term)
PSCI 102 - Introduction to Comparative and Global Politics - 3 credits (second term)
                      OR
SOCI 101 - Introduction to Sociology I - 3 credits (first term) 
SOCI 102 - Introduction to Sociology II - 3 credits (second term)
 
If you are unsure which of these three subjects to choose, look at the upper-level courses in each discipline to see which appeal to you the most.  As you will very likely take additional courses in this subject, upper-level courses in which you have the most interest should dictate your choice of introductory-level courses.
 

Elective Arts/Science Subject for Economics Major
Your remaining 6 credits will normally be in another arts subject, though they could be chosen from the sciences. You may choose a second subject from the above three (anthropology, political science, sociology), or from any of the other subjects listed below. Click on each to learn more.

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following table are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

Arts Subjects
Anthropology
Art (Art History and Studio Art)
Catholic Studies
Celtic Studies
Classical Studies
Climate and Environment **
Computer Science *
Development Studies
English
French
German
History
Mathematics & Statistics *
Mi’kmaq
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Public Policy and Governance
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Women’s and Gender Studies
* Mathematics & Statistics and Computer Science are departments in the Faculty of Science, but for purposes of pairs (see definition below) and electives in the BA programs, Computer Science and Mathematics are considered as arts subjects.
** Climate and Environment may be considered as either an arts or a science subject.  For a BA student, it would be considered as an arts subject.
  
Science Subjects
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
 
 
Things to Remember
  • When building your course schedule, begin with required courses that are offered in only one timeblock, and schedule other courses around those.
  • When choosing your arts/science elective, explore your available options from the list above. You may decide to choose a subject that is familiar to you, but don’t hesitate to be adventurous and try something new. 
  • The BA degree requires the completion of “pairs”. (A “pair” is 12 credits in one subject – see the Glossary of Terms for a full definition). If you like your elective subject this year, you can take an additional 6 credits in that subject over the remaining years of your program and complete one of your pairs that way.

  • If you find, by year-end, that you are not interested in taking additional courses in your first-year elective subject, don’t worry. The BA degree also has open electives in its degree pattern. This subject may be used as an elective in your program, and you can choose different subjects in second year to use as foundation courses for pairs. So you can choose your elective this year risk-free!
 
Notes re Science Courses
  • Although BA students are permitted to take science courses, some of the science subjects may be more readily accessible than others during your initial registration.
  • Physics 101 and 102 or 121 and 122 are allowable science options for you. The department also offers two first-year astronomy courses, PHYS 171 and 172, which were developed for non-science students. You are welcome to take these astronomy courses as arts/science electives, but they cannot be used as part of a pair because upper-year physics courses require either PHYS 101 and 102 or 121 and 122 as prerequisites.
  • Chemistry may be restricted to science students until have all have registered. You may be able to register for CHEM 101 and 102 or 121 and 122 when you register for your other courses.  However, if you try to do so and receive a "College Restriction" error message, contact the chemistry department chair to request to be added to a waiting list. Usually, non-science students are ultimately able to register in introductory chemistry courses, but sometimes not until later in the summer.  In the meantime, be sure to choose and register in a different course, in case you are not able to get a seat in the introductory chemistry courses that you want.
  • Biology 112 is a required first-year course in your program.  If you wish to take more biology, you will most likely want to take BIOL 111 in your first year.  This course may be restricted to science students until all have registered.  You may be able to register for BIOL 111 when you register for your other courses.  However, if you try to do so and receive a "College Restriction" error message, contact the biology department chair to request to be added to a waiting list.  Usually, non-science students are ultimately able to register in this course, but sometimes not until later in the summer.  In the meantime, be sure to choose and register in a different course, in case you are not able to get a seat in BIOL 111.  (Note that BIOL 111 is only a 3-credit course, so you will need to choose a 3-credit course in another subject if you want to carry a full course load in your first year.)
 
Questions You Might Have
 
1.  I am interested in Development Studies, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and science subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course.  Although most students choose to do 6 credits in one subject for their 6 credits of arts/science elective, DEVS 101 plus 3 credits of a second subject would also work in your program, so be assured that this is an acceptable option.  If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in DEVS, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of DEVS, to include DEVS 201 and 202, over the remaining years of your degree.
 
2.  I am interested in Public Policy and Governance, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the other semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and science subjects listed above.  If you choose to take PGOV 101 in the first semester, you will need to ensure that your second-semester course choice does not have a first-term prerequisite.  Although most students choose to do 6 credits in one subject for their 6 credits of arts/science elective, PGOV 101 plus 3 credits of a second subject would also work in your program, so be assured that this is an acceptable option.  If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in PGOV, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of PGOV, to include PGOV 201 or 202, over the remaining years of your degree.
 
3.  Why is Earth Sciences not listed in the allowable Science Subjects above?
You are already taking ESCI 171 as part of your degree program.  In addition, your required AQUA 100 course serves as a substitute for ESCI 172 so AQUA students do not take ESCI 172.  You are therefore already taking the introductory level courses for ESCI this year.  Should you wish to take additional ESCI courses in future years, you will have the prerequisites to do so by completing your program's core courses this year.
 
4. What if I am interested in taking a course in a subject that is not mentioned above?
The other subjects offered at StFX are in our other professional or applied programs: Business Administration; Engineering; Health; Human Kinetics; Human Nutrition; Nursing. (Aquatic Resources also falls into this category.)  Most courses in these departments are restricted to students in these programs. In second year, you will take BSAD 101.  For future years, there are some Human Nutrition courses and two 300-level Nursing elective courses that are open to students outside of those programs. If you are interested in taking other courses from one of these departments you will need to contact the relevant department chair.  (Courses in Health and Nursing are not options for students outside those programs, but permission is sometimes granted for Business Administration, Engineering, and Human Kinetics courses.)