Other Projects

Safe Places for Aging and Care

2019-2023

Investigators:

PI: Dr.  Rachel Herron
Co-Is: Dr. Katie Aubrecht, Dr. Douglas Brownridge, Dr. Laura Funk, Dr. Dale Spencer, Dr. Christine Kelly, Dr. Lori Weeks

Study Summary:

There is an urgent need to address different forms of violence and strengthen violence prevention strategies across the long-term care continuum. Violence can lead to physical and psychological harm, emotional exhaustion, and burnout for carers while being regarded as violent, aggressive, or difficult can have a direct impact on older adults’ sense of self, care relationships, and quality of care. What is missing from current research on violence and aging is in-depth understanding of the environments and circumstances that enable or inhibit violent interactions across settings of care. The overall goal of this research is to identify how and why features of care environments (social, physical, cultural and organizational) influence violent actions among older adults and carers and to inform the development of more effective violence prevention strategies across structures, settings and relations of care.

Media Release

Website

 

The Impact of COVID-19 on Nova Scotians Living with Chronic Conditions Study

2019-2021

Investigators:

Co-PIs: Dr. Jeanna Parsons Leigh and Dr. Tanya Packer  
Co-Is:  Dr. Asa Audulv, Dr. Katie Aubrecht Dr. Mark Embrett, Emily Fitzgerald, Dr. Heather Helpard, Dr. George Kephart, Michael Liddell, Dr. Ruth Martin-Meisner, Dr. Debra Sheppard-Lemoine
Wider Team: Emily Fitzgerald and Sabrena Jaswal

Study Summary:

There is a need to understand the impact that a global pandemic can have on people living with underlying chronic health conditions. Nova Scotians living with chronic conditions are considered vulnerable during global crises such as infectious disease pandemics. They are also most likely to be impacted by changes made to the health care services during and after the pandemic.

The aim of this study is to understand the impact that COVID-19 has had on Nova Scotians who live with two or more chronic health conditions using an inductive qualitative approach. The study team will set out to gain an understanding of participants’ perceptions of:

  • The impact COVID-19 has and continues to have on their health, health care, and personal lives.
     
  • Their perspectives on possible mitigation and recovery strategies and directions for the “new normal” in health care delivery.

Results are expected to contribute to future health system and services’ planning, preparedness, and education in the face of a public health crisis.

Funding Source: This project is funded by Research Nova Scotia as part of a larger research profile looking at the impact of COVID-19 for the amount of $77,080.00 over two years.

Website

 

Seniors-Adding Life to Years (SALTY)

2016-2021

Investigators:

Co-PIs: Dr. Janice Keefe (NPI) and Dr. Carole Estabrooks
SALTY Team

Study Summary:

Seniors – Adding Life to Years (SALTY) is a four-year research project, developed by researchers, care providers, care administrators, policy makers and older adults and their families from across Canada. The project aims to add quality to late life for people living in long term care and for their caregivers, including family, friends, volunteers and care workers who support their care. SALTY’s research is organized into four interrelated streams: Monitor Care Practice, Map Promising Approaches to Care Relationships, Evaluate Innovative Practice, and Examine Policy Context. The project which employs diverse and multiple methods is being conducted in four Canadian provinces – British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Nova Scotia and will have relevance for jurisdictions across Canada.

The Mapping Care Relationships team led by Dr. Tamara Daly, Dr. Ivy Bourgeault and Dr. Katie Aubrecht aims to identify how promising approaches to late life long-term care can enhance care relationships and quality of work.

Funding Source: The project is funded through a Late Life Issues grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (FRN145401), in partnership with Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (FRN16738), Research Nova Scotia (formerly Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation) (FRN2016-870) and Alzheimer Society of Canada, 2016 through to 2020.

Media Release

Website

Project Video